NFL Allows Anti-Cop Socks, but Outlaws Pro-Cop Decals

Last month San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick showed up at a pre-season camp wearing socks that featured cartoon pigs wearing police hats, USA Today reports.

The embattled second-rate quarterback defended his anti-police apparel on Instagram. 

"I wore those socks, in the past, because the rogue cops that are allowed to hold positions in police departments, not only put the community in danger, but also put the cops that have the right intentions in danger by creating an environment of tension and mistrust," he wrote.

Kaepernick apparently despises the police more than he despises the national anthem. 

The latest twist in the anti-American Kaepernick saga reveals an ugly double standard in the National Football League.

Last month, the NFL rejected a request from the Dallas Cowboys to wear decals honoring the memory of five assassinated police officers.

So why is it okay for players to wear anti-cop socks, but not pro-cop decals?

“It’s just ridiculous that the same league that prohibits the Dallas (Cowboys) football club from honoring the slain officers in their community with their uniforms stands silent when Kaepernick is dishonoring police officers with what he’s wearing on the field," Bill Johnson, executive director of the National Association of Police Organizations, told USA Today.