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CANCEL CULTURE: Memphis to Consider Renaming ‘Audubon Park’

The Memphis City Council will discuss renaming a beloved and historic city park because someone got triggered by the name.

Council Member Patrice Robinson sponsored two ordinances that were set to be discussed by the council in executive session to rename Audubon Park. The park was named in honor of 19th century naturalist John James Audubon.

Should Councilwoman Robinson get her way the park would be renamed in honor of Miriam DeCosta-Willis, a black civil rights activist. Email Councilwoman Robinson at [email protected]

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“Removing the name John James Audubon from a prominent culturally-inclusive park is important in communicating a message of diversity, inclusion and unity in Memphis. If the Memphis City Council wishes to name the park, or any public spaces, for an individual, there are Memphians and non-Memphians who are more than deserving of this honor,” wrote Thelma Crivens in a column published by The Daily Memphian.

Crivens is a member of the notorious City Council Renaming Commission – a collection of culture jihadists who have been tasked with turning the city’s past into a heaping pile of rubble.

She noted that Audubon was “a white supremacist and enslaver who bought and sold enslaved people, opposed the abolitionist movement and considered African Americans and Native Americans inferior.”

Audubon died in 1851 and was unavailable for comment.“After growing up as an African American woman in segregated Memphis, I am pleased to see that the city is removing these controversial statues and names,” Crivens wrote.

In recent years the Memphis City Council has taken an aggressive approach to erasing and whitewashing the city’s history. They’ve renamed three parks that had ties to the Civil War — Nathan Bedford Forrest Park, Jefferson Davis Park and Confederate Park.

And they most recently desecrated the grave of Nathan Bedford Forrest. In Memphis, even the Confederate dead are not allowed to rest in peace.

Quite frankly, the city should just save the taxpayers time and money and rename any building, street or park that’s been named after a dead white guy.

And for that matter, they should also rename the city of Memphis. Anyone who’s read the Old Testament knows Egypt has a particularly nasty history when it comes to slavery.

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