American Evangelicals are a ‘Moral Freak Show’: MSNBC Panel

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An MSNBC panel concluded that the Evangelical movement has become a “moral freak show” because it has rejected science, education and taught “Donald Trump is the second coming of Jesus Christ”   

During a panel discussion on Monday, American writer Peter Wehner accused Evangelicals of adopting far-right conspiracy beliefs because they are “legalistic,” “anti-intellectual” and “anti-science.”

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“There’s an almost existential fear among many people on the Christian Right about… progressivism and the Left,” Wehner told MSNBC, calling the problem impacting American Christianity “a fusion between fundamentalism and evangelicalism” which are “two very different and distinct things.” 

He defines fundamentalism as “legalistic,” “anti-intellectual” and “anti-science,” which he says has “created a dangerous mix, or cocktail, in the evangelical world, and they have so wandered away from the core messages of Christ and the Gospel.” 

He concludes that young people are leaving churches because of they see this “more freak show and want nothing to do with it.” 

Watch the discussion below:

MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough agreed, doubling down on the “legalism” concering cultural issues that has flooded Evangelical church.  

“Abortion. The legalism is around gay marriage. The legalism is around Critical Race Theory…. That is not the definition of the Gospels,” Scarborough said. “That is not what Jesus’ life was about. [The Gospel] is reduced to abortion.” 

The discussion came after last week’s contentious Sothern Baptist Convention, which Wehner said was “representative” of conspiracy theories that have infiltrated American churches.  

“The drama playing out within the [Southern Baptist Convention] is representative of the wider struggle within American Christianity,” wrote Wehner in the New York Times, which Mika Brzezinski read on the segment “And in fact, the Christian faith has far too often become a weapon in the arsenal of those who worship at the altar of politics.”