Most American Journalists Are Just Not Very Good: Weinberg

Last week, I wrote about Fox News caving to the left by somehow thinking that allowing people to parrot Democratic talking points in their “fair and balanced” panels is actual journalism.

Turns out I was not alone.

We got well over 100,000 reactions, most of them agreeing.

Knowing that, if I were Lachlan Murdoch, I would be thinking that my positive cash flow might not last forever.

What would happen, as an example, if Comcast (NBC) or AT&T (CNN) did some market research and discovered the weakness of Fox, which has always been hugely profitable? Could you imagine if the officers of AT&T walked into CNN one morning and replaced the screaming liberals? What if they hired Bill O’Reilly?

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You would hear tuners clicking all over the nation.

I’m not going to hold my breath, but AT&T and Comcast both have big market research capability and the bottom line is always the bottom line. Big public corporations exist solely to make money.

All of that said, I think we credit way too much power to the “media.”

I have been involved in the media my entire working life at all levels from small-town weekly newspapers and radio stations to network TV.

The truth is that a 24-hour cable channel is very repetitive and — in general — not very exciting. When the morons at CNN start going off on the president, there are very few viewers still watching who do not already know their moronic politics.

Most voters in this country — you and I, that is — are a lot smarter than the blond chicks, the well-promoted hair hats, the self-identified elites who make up that we now call the media.

Truth be told, they are not smart enough to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the people we select to lead us. In general, they’re the kind of people who, when you shake their hands, you want to take a shower.

As an example, what gives Don Lemon any special insight into anything?

The only thing he knows for sure is that he hates Donald Trump.

And I’m willing to bet that if AT&T actually did the research I’m sure it is capable of, it will discover that very few people share the inflated opinion of CNN’s trustworthiness that it has of itself.

I’m guessing that same applies to most of the hair hats — even those on the Republican side.

Average folks simply don’t turn news people into stars. If you want to be a star, work on a sitcom or a variety show. Or become an athlete.

We don’t have news stars, just reporters — and most of them are simply not very good.

That said, most of the national media is censoring reality and not carrying pictures of the violence in America’s cities. Is that helping the left?

No.

Local television, however, has most of the same technology the big boys do and is using it to show those very pictures. And, for every CNN and MSNBC, there is a Sinclair that is conservative and is a large owner of local television stations, with 173 stations in 81 broadcast markets that stretch from coast to coast. That’s the news people are watching. Not CNN or MSNBC.

Then there’s Nexstar, which just rolled out an evening news network from its WGN-TV in Chicago.

Nexstar has 197 stations as of this writing.

Finally, there’s this great fear of Google and Facebook. It’s doubtful that any serious voter gets any serious information to influence their vote from these clowns. Those folks exist for one reason — to sell you stuff. And, secondarily, for scams. Tech boys, we’re on to you.

I’m not nearly as concerned by what we call the media as a lot of folks are. We’re, quite simply, smarter than their hair hats are and we know it.

Fred Weinberg is the publisher of the Penny Press, an online publication based in Reno, Nevada (pennypressnv.com). He also is the CEO of the USA Radio Networks and several companies which own or operate radio stations throughout the United States. He has spent 53 years in journalism at every level from small town weekly newspapers to television networks. He can be reached at pennypresslv@gmail.com. 

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