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Meet the 71 Republicans Who Voted Against the McCarthy/Biden Debt Ceiling Increase

A divided U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill to suspend the $31.4 trillion debt ceiling on Wednesday, with majority support from both Democrats and Republicans to overcome opposition from hardline conservatives and avoid a catastrophic default.

“More Democrats voted for the McCarthy-Biden debt ceiling deal than Republicans,” said national radio host Todd Starnes. “That should tell you how devastating this plan is for the American taxpayers.”

The Republican-controlled House voted 314-117 to send the legislation to the Senate, which must enact the measure and get it to President Joe Biden’s desk before a Monday deadline, when the federal government is expected to run out of money to pay its bills.

Biden expects to have the bill on his desk in time to avoid a default that would cripple the U.S. economy and unsettle world financial markets.

Shortly after the House vote, Biden tweeted a message expressing his approval of the passage, and urging the Senate to follow suit expeditiously: “Tonight, the House took a critical step forward to prevent a first-ever default and protect our country’s hard-earned and historic economic recovery. I have been clear that the only path forward is a bipartisan compromise that can earn the support of both parties. This agreement meets that test. I urge the Senate to pass it as quickly as possible so that I can sign it into law, and our country can continue building the strongest economy in the world.”

The measure, a compromise between Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy, drew opposition from 71 hardline Republicans. That would normally be enough to block partisan legislation, but 165 Democrats backed the measure and pushed it through.

Republicans control the House by a narrow 222-213 majority.

The legislation suspends – in essence, temporarily removes – the federal government’s borrowing limit through Jan. 1, 2025. The timeline allows Biden and Congress to set aside the politically risky issue until after the November 2024 presidential election.

It would also cap some government spending over the next two years, speed up the permitting process for certain energy projects, claw back unused COVID-19 funds and expand work requirements for food aid programs to additional recipients.

Hardline Republicans had wanted deeper spending cuts and more stringent reforms.

“At best, we have a two-year spending freeze that’s full of loopholes and gimmicks,” said Representative Chip Roy, a prominent member of the hardline House Freedom Caucus.

The 71 Republicans who voted against the plan include the following lawmakers:

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