Doctor Banned By YouTube Tell Todd Starnes Data Doesn’t Support Coronavirus Lockdown

One of the doctors in the viral video that questioned state lockdown orders, which was subsequently removed by YouTube told the “Todd Starnes Radio Show” Wednesday that his sole focus is data and getting Americans back to work.

Dr. Dan Erickson, a co-owner at Accelerated Urgent Care in California’s Kern County, told the show that of all the models out there, the Swedish one, orchestrated in part by epidemiologist Anders Tegnell, has proven to be the most effective.

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The country did not implement any shelter-in-place orders and instead focused on good hygiene, social distancing and protecting the vulnerable population. Erickson said the result is essentially in line with countries that took far more oppressive measures to contain the virus.

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“The disease that we’re seeing in California does not necessitate a hardcore lockdown,” he said. “So what YouTube thinks or what they pull on and off is not the big story. The big story is how do we get all these Americans back to work.”

Erickson said the press conference that went viral was supposed to just be an exchange of raw data. He said in all of Kern County, which has nearly a million residents, there are 14 patients hospitalized and two on ventilators, according to his research. He said the county has seen six deaths.

These numbers, he said, are in line with the common flu. He said he called hospitals in other cities outside of New York and was told that the surge that they expected never materialized.

Erickson said in the YouTube video, “Do we need to still shelter in place? Our answer is no. Do we need businesses to be shut down? No. Do we need to test them and get them back to work? Yes we do.”

Erickson’s video got the attention of Tesla’s Elon Musk who praised his comments. YouTube later removed the video due to its vague “community guidelines.”

YouTube told 23ABC that, “We know that this might be disappointing, but it’s important to us that YouTube is a safe place for all. If content breaks our rules, we remove it. If you think we’ve made a mistake, you can appeal and we’ll take another look.”

Experts jumped on Erickson and his colleague, Dr. Artin Massihi, for peddling unproven statistics. One compared their research to going to an NBA basketball game to try and gauge the average human’s height.

Erickson insisted that it is the government’s job to reopen the economy and try and educate the public about ways to mitigate transmission.

“So, I say to myself—the biggest question that we can ask—is, “Is the collateral damage of shutting down an economy indeed worse than the illness itself?’”

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