‘Ecosexuals’ Marry One Another — and Earth

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It sounds like a joke, only the people behind it are not kidding. Radical environmentalists are marrying one another – and the Earth. These people prefer to be called “ecosexuals,” and one couple captured the attention of CNN.

“We’re really trying to change the lens that people see the Earth through,” said Beth Stephens in a CNN Style article that also featured her long-time partner Annie Sprinkle. “Rather than as a resource, we want people to see the Earth as a source of pleasure in life and health. They’re really interconnected.”

The ceremonies are anything but small. When Sprinkle and Stephens married the earth in 2008, 300 green-garbed guests were in attendance. Over time, the couple has traveled to various locales to marry the sky, moon, sun, and snow. The pair even documents their behavior in a book titled “Assuming the Ecosexual Position: The Earth as Lover.”

Sprinkle hopes it inspires other ecosexuals to follow suit, going so far as to provide instructions on how to marry elements of nature.

“We’ve passed on the wedding torch to future generations and future brides and grooms,” Sprinkle told CNN.

Marc Morano of Climate Depot is not surprised.

“In my archive at Climate Depot, I go back at last five years on the exact phrase of ‘ecosexuality’ and there are people saying humans should establish erotic relationships with plants,” says Morano. “So, this is deeply embedded and it’s part of a deep-green ecology where they sort of look at the earth as some kind of a spirit-sexual relationship.”

“It’s fitting that CNN published this under the ‘Style’ category because it has no substance,” says Cal Beisner, founder and spokesman for the Cornwall Alliance For The Stewardship Of Creation. “This is theater of the absurd—and it’s as disturbing the media and the public pay attention to it as that it happens in the first place”

Beisner adds that it demonstrates utter incomprehension of what marriage is all about—a covenantal relationship of mutual commitment between one man and one woman promising love, care, and fidelity for life. 

“Marrying the earth, the sky, the moon, the Adriatic Sea—there’s no mutual commitment there, and there’s no real meaning to whatever “commitment” Sprinkle and Stephens may make to them,” says Beisner. 

Pointing to the Holy Bible’s Epistle to the Romans, Beisner says the first chapter warns that those who worship the creature rather than the Creator become fools by God giving them over to a depraved mind to do what is contrary to sexual nature.

“These women, and those who join them in celebrating “ecosexuality,” go even farther in their rebellion,” says Beisner. “Human sexuality is meant to form a sacred “one-flesh” union between two human beings. Not only Scripture but also nature itself teaches this. Sprinkle and Stephens may think themselves nature worshipers. In reality, by turning their backs on God, they’ve turned their backs on nature by treating it as what it’s not—a proper object of worship.”

Marc Morano says there is definitely a religious aspect to ecosexuality, something he thinks began with making climate issues a religion. 

“Former United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Chairman Rajendra Pachauri said global warming is his religion, that protection of the earth was his religion,” says Morano. “So, if you have those kinds of passions, that kind of deepness, that kind of spirituality, it’s only a matter of time before it’s going to come into this weird sexuality that they’re calling ecosexuals.”